Writing ELA Objectives

What do you want your students to learn as a result of the lesson?

Click this amazing link for GOALS in all of the content areas!  It comes in handy to write objectives, too!  ANOTHER GREAT GOAL LINK!

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Step 1:  CREATE A STEM

  • After completing the lesson, the students (we) will be able to. . .
  • After this unit, the students (we) will. . .
  • By completing the activities, the students (we) will. . .
  • During this lesson, the students (we) will. . .

Make the stems kid friendly!  :)

Step 2:  ADD A VERB

  • After completing the lesson, the students (we) will be able to predict. . .
  • After this unit, the students (we) will distinguish. . .
  • By completing the activities, the students (we) will construct. . .
  • During this lesson, the students (we) will defend. . .

Step 3:  DETERMINE ACTUAL PRODUCT, PROCESS, OUTCOME

SAMPLES  ~ notice how the objectives become more challenging as we move through Bloom’s Taxonomy.  Try to teach towards the upper end of Bloom’s Taxonomy. 

The student will. . .

KNOWLEDGE: 

  • Draw scenes from chapter_______.  Under each scene describe what is happening. 
  • Use a story map to show the events in chapter ________.
  • Draw a cartoon strip of the beginning, middle and end of the chapter.
  • List the story’s main events.
  • Make a timeline of events.
  • Make a facts chart.
  • List the pieces of information you remember.
  • Make an acrostic.
  • Recite a poem.
  • Make a chart showing. . . .

COMPREHENSION: 

  • Draw a picture that summarizes the chapter.  Write a sentence that tells about the picture. 
  • Summarize the chapter in own words in one paragraph.
  • Summarize the chapter in own words in two paragraphs.
  • Cut out or draw pictures to show an event in the story.
  • Illustrate the main idea.
  • Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events.
  • Write and perform a play based on the story.
  • Make a coloring book based on the story.
  • Retell the story.
  • Paint a picture of your favorite part. 
  • Prepare a flow chart of the sequence of events.
  • Write a summary.

APPLICATION: 

  • Pretend you are a new character to the story.  Tell how you would change the story’s ending.
  • With a partner, change the ending of the story.  One person be a new character and the other be a character from the book.
  • In a group, act out the ending of the story.
  • Construct a model to demonstrate how something worked.
  • Make a diorama to illustrate an important event.
  • Compose a book about. . . .
  • Make a scrapbook about. . . .
  • Make a paper-mache map showing information about. . . .
  • Make a puzzle game using ideas from the book.
  • Make a clay model of. . . .
  • Paint a mural of . . . .
  • Design a market strategy for a product.
  • Design an ethnic costume.

ANALYSIS: 

  • Take an event in the text.  Make a text-to-world connection.
  • Take an event from the story and make a text-to-text connection.
  • Take an event from the story and make a text-to-self connection.
  • Design a questionnaire to gather information.
  • Make a flow chart to show critical stages.
  • Write a commercial for the book.
  • Review the illustrations in terms of form, color, texture.
  • Construct a graph to illustrate selected information.
  • Construct a jigsaw puzzle.
  • Analyze a family tree showing relationships.
  • Write a biography about a person being studied.

SYNTHESIS: 

  • Design a list of 10 solutions to help a character solve a problem.
  • Write a dialogue between you and one of the characters in the book.  Help the character solve a problem.
  • Meet with a partner and role play how to solve one of the character’s problems.
  • Invent a machine to do specific tasks from the text.
  • Design a building.
  • Create a new product, give it a name, and plan a marketing campaign.
  • Write about your feelings in relation to. . . .
  • Write a tv show, a puppet show, pantomime, or sing about. . . .
  • Design a book or magazine cover about. . . .
  • Devise a way to. . . .
  • Create a language code. . . .
  • Compose a rhythm or put new words in a melody.

EVALUATE: 

  • Choose a character and fill out a T chart.  Express your opinion of the character using 3 pieces of evidence from the book. 
  • Choose a character and fill out a T chart to express your opinion of the character.  Come up with one good detail and discuss it with a partner. 
  • Choose a character from the book.  Express your opinion of this character using 5 pieces of evidence from the book in T chart form.  Use the T chart, and then write a paragraph. 
  • Prepare a list of criteria to judge the book.  Indicate priority and ratings.
  • Conduct a debate about an area of special interest.
  • Make a booklet about 5 qualitities a character in the book possessed.
  • Form a panel to discuss a topic.  Discuss criteria.
  • Write a letter to_____ advising changes needed.
  • Prepare arguments to present your view about. . . .

 MORE SAMPLES…

Language Arts Examples
After completing the lesson, the students (we) will be able to: 

 

  • record understanding/knowledge by creating pictures . . .
  • use the vocabulary of _____ (shapes, colors, etc.) to describe _____ (flowers, etc.)
  • explain the meaning of the word(s): _____.
  • generate ideas and plans for writing by using _____ (brainstorming, clustering, etc.)
  • develop a draft . . .
  • edit a draft for a specific purpose such as _____ (word choice, etc.)
  • discuss the differences and similarities between the two main characters from _____ and _____.
  • identify the definition of _____ (fables, fairy tales, etc.).
  • understand and be able to identify the traditional elements in _____ (fables, fairy tales, etc.)
  • define the literary term _____.
  • retell in his/her own words _____.
  • summarize the plot of _____.
  • make inferences from the text . . .
  • demonstrate understanding by writing three facts about . . .
  • listen critically to interpret and evaluate . . .
  • represent textual information by _____ (drawing, painting, etc.)
  • recognize and list the literary devices found in _____.
  • state an opinion about _____, using examples from the text to support the opinion
  • compare and contrast the experience of _____ (a character in a text) to his or her own life using a Venn diagram
  • list the primary plot details in _____ (a text, short story, novel, or drama)
  • compare and contrast three different versions of _____ (Cinderella, The Three Little Pigs, etc.) using a Venn diagram
  • write a narrative version of _____, with appropriate plot characteristics of the genre
  • compare excerpts of _____ (a novel) to first-hand accounts of _____ (the Civil War, WWI, etc.)
  • describe _____ (Victorian, Elizabethan, etc.) attitudes toward _____ (a social concern, a vice, a virtue, an event, etc.)
  • analyze _____ (a character’s) desire to _____
  • list elements of _____ (a writer’s) style in _____ (a text)
  • identify and trace the development of _____ literature from _____ to _____
  • define basic literary terms and apply them to _____ (a specific text or work)
  • produce an effective essay which details _____
  • produce an effective persuasive essay which takes a stand for/against _____
  • use the work of _____ as inspiration for a representative piece about _____
  • draw parallels between _____(a text) and _____ (a text)
  • explore the nature and implications of _____ (a vice, a virtue, a societal concern, a characteristic, etc.)
  • recite a poem (or excerpt of text) with fluency
  • use specific examples in _____ (a text) to illustrate an aspect of human behavior
  • compose a _____ (haiku, verse, rhyme, poem, etc.)
  • describe the traditional rules and conventions of _____ (haiku, the personal essay, etc.)
  • demonstrate mastery in the study of _____ through cooperative learning and research. . .

 

MORE. . .

Reading Comprehension

  • The student will use prereading strategies to predict what the story is about on a post-it note.  The student will explain if his/her prediction was confirmed or not at the end of class, with supporting details from the text.
  • During the lesson, the student will generate a list of questions about the story as he/she reads.
  • After completing the lesson, the student will be able to make generalizations and draw conclusions about the events in the story by citing three examples.
  • After reading the text, the student will be able to answer questions about the story’s meaning.
  • At the end of the lesson, the student will be able to summarize the passages.
  • By completng the activities, the student will be able to discuss interpretations of the story.
  • After reading the text, the student will cite passages to support questions and ideas.
  • The student will be able to use context to figure out word meanings, and write these meanings on the post-it notes.
  • During this lesson, the student will read with a purpose and take notes to monitor comprehension.
  • During this lesson, the student will practice using a variety of reading strategies, and explain how two strategies were used.
  • By the end of this unit, the students will be able to apply critical reading strategies in order to identify main ideas in short passages with 70% mastery.

Critical Thinking

  • During this lesson the student will generate ideas with a clear focus in response to questions.
  • By the end of this lesson, the student will support ideas with relevant evidence.
  • The students will respond to other students’ ideas, questions, and arguments.
  • During this lesson, the students will question other students’ perspectives in a debate.
  • By the end of this lesson, the students will present ideas logically and persuasively in writing.

Listening and Speaking

  • During this lesson, the student will comprehend as stories are read aloud, by participating in Every Pupil Response activities.
  • By the end of this lesson, the students will listen actively and carefully to others, and retell others’ opinions and ideas.
  • During this lesson, the students will respond to other students’ questions while actively participating in a group discussion.

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COPYRIGHT 09/12/2012.  PLEASE CITE AS FOLLOWS:

Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS. “Writing ELA Objectives.”  Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist.  N.p., 12 Sept. 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/writingelaobjectives/>.

Adapted from Education Oasis Curriculum Resources.

Graphics from Google Images.  Right click on them.

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