Expectations By Grade Level

 
 
GENERAL INFORMATION!
  • No more than 10 errors per 100 words, including words that you had to tell your child, is acceptable.  Child must also demonstrate comprehension.  This would be considered the Instructional level.  94% accuracy and above is the Independent level ~ your child can read and comprehend without any instruction.  (In other words, 6 errors or less per 100 words.)  
  • Comprehension with the book closed is critical!  Grades K and 1 should retell the story, make a connection to his/her life or another book, tell favorite part and why.  Grades 2 and up should retell, tell the lesson that the author is teaching, tell the most important event and why.
  • Once your child gets to Level I (end of grade one), speed (words per minute) is important!  Calculate that as follows!
  DRA2 Level Minimum Words Per Minute  to the Pass DRA2 Independent Reading Level Guided Reading Level ~ What Level the Teacher Will Teach At Based on DRA2 Benchmark Expectation
K A/1     A  
K 2   A B  
K 3   B C June
1 4   C D  
1 6   D E  
1 8   E F  
1 10   F G January
1 12   G H  
1 14 40 wpm H I  
1 16 45 wpm I J June
2 18 55 wpm J K November
2 20 65 wpm K L March
2 24 70 wpm L M June
3 28 75 wpm M N November
3 30 80 wpm N O March
3 34 80 wpm O P June
4 38 90 wpm P Q November

Nonfiction words per minute are now differing.

4 40 105 F Q R March
4   100 NF      
4 40 105 F R S June
4   100 NF      
5 40 105 F S T November
5   100 NF      
5 50 115 F T U March
    110 NF      
5 50 115 F U V June
5   110 NF      

 

Nonfiction DRA2 options are available for Levels 16, 28, 38, 40, 50.

**40 is listed 3x and 50 is listed 2x. The goal is to become a stronger/higher scorer at each assessment point, and to also give the student an opportunity to be assessed in fiction and nonfiction at the 40 and/or 50.

Words Per Minute By Month/Grade/Level

To calculate WPM:

___words in the book divided by ___SECONDS it took to read X 60 = __WPM

For example, say there were 207 words in a book.  The child read it in 3 min. 25 seconds, which is 205 seconds.  207 divided by 205 is approximately 1.0 words per second x 60 = 60 WPM!

This table is from the DRA2 manual and shows the MINIMUM amount of words per minute acceptable in order the proceed to next level.

2006 Hasbrouck & Tindal Oral Reading Fluency Data
Grade Percentile Fall WCPM* Winter WCPM* Spring WCPM* Avg. Weekly
Improvement**
1 90
75
  81
47
111
82
1.9
2.2
50   23 53 1.9
25
10
  12
6
28
15
1.0
0.6
2 90
75
106
79
125
100
142
117
1.1
1.2
50 51 72 89 1.2
25
10
25
11
42
18
61
31
1.1
0.6
3 90
75
128
99
146
120
162
137
1.1
1.2
50 71 92 107 1.1
25
10
44
21
62
36
78
48
1.1
0.8
4 90
75
145
119
166
139
180
152
1.1
1.0
50 94 112 123 0.9
25
10
68
45
87
61
98
72
0.9
0.8
5 90
75
166
139
182
156
194
168
0.9
0.9
50 110 127 139 0.9
25
10
85
61
99
74
109
83
0.8
0.7
6 90
75
177
153
195
167
204
177
0.8
0.8
50 127 140 150 0.7
25
10
98
68
111
82
122
93
0.8
0.8
7 90
75
180
156
195
165
202
177
0.7
0.7
50 128 136 150 0.7
25
10
102
79
109
88
123
98
0.7
0.6
8 90
75
185
161
199
177
199
177
0.4
0.5
50 133 151 151 0.6
25
10
106
77
124
97
124
97
0.6
0.6

This table shows approximate percentile ranks for correct words per minute at 3 points during the school year!

* WCPM = Words Correct Per Minute

Please cite me. Page compiled by:  Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS. "Expectations By Grade Level." Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist. N.p., 4 May 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/expectations-by-grade-level/>.

To go directly to your child's grade, simply click on the corresponding link above.  These expectations come from the Developmental Reading Assessment 2 by Joetta Beaver, 2006.  Parents, look what is expected at your child’s grade, and apply these to reading at home! 

Kindergarten Reading Expectations

To Meet the Benchmark, kindergarten students should be instructional at Level C by June.  Level B is their independent level.

AT LEVELS A – C,
A CHILD’S READING LEVEL IS DETERMINED BY:

• Is the child reading with accuracy?  No more than 1 error per 10 words.
• Is the child using the pictures and letter sounds to figure out unknown words?
• Does the child recognize his/her mistakes and does the child go back to fix them?
• Is he/she demonstrating understanding of the directionality of print from left to right?
• Can he/she show directionality on two or more lines of text?
• Is he/she pointing to each word with consistent 1:1 matching?
• Can the child hold the book and turn the pages independently?
• Does the child demonstrate an understanding of the terms: begins with, ends with, letter, and sound? For example, “Find the word that begins with this letter: g.  Find the word that ends with this sound /b/.”

Your child will be asked who reads to him/her at home, and to share a title and specific details about a favorite book.  There will also be a survey given asking the child:  What books have you finished lately?  What are you reading at school now?  What are you reading at home now? What are 3 things you do well as a reader?  What are 3 things you need to work on to become a better reader?

***When you read at home with your child, it is important to have your child point to each word, and figure out unknown words on his/her own by:
a. Look at the picture b. Look at beginning letter sound c. Sound it out

Always read each book 3x for fluency and accuracy.

OTHER KINDERGARTEN ASSESSMENTS / REQUIREMENTS

Each are 1 minute tests:

  • Beginning and Middle of Year:    After hearing a word, the child has to segment the 1st sound.  For example the first sound in “man” is /m/.  The first sound in “shell” is /sh/.  The first sound in “blend” is /b/.
  • All Year:    How many letters can you name (upper and lower case mixed).
  • Middle and End of Year:  Segment individual sounds heard in a word, for example “apple” /a/ /p/ /l/ and “holes” is /h/ /o/ /l/ /z/.
  • Middle and End of Year:  Read 3 letter short vowel nonsense words ~ these can be sounded out ~ for example “sil”  “tob”  “paj”  “zev”  “nud.”  The goal is for the child to recognize these chunks automatically, not sounding out sound by sound.

What Does An ADVANCED Kindergartener Look Like While Applying Strategies?

Making Connections/Prior Knowledge Uses background knowledge to enhance comprehension and   interpretation.  Makes text-to-text and   text-to-self connections; uses knowledge of familiar authors to make   predictions.  (For ex., Curious George often gets into trouble.)
Questioning Asks questions to enhance meaning; can easily answer  questions; beginning awareness of different types of questions ~ literal (answers are IN the text) and inferential (answers come from life experience)
Visualizing/Sensory Imagery Describes own sensory images; images can be elaborated   from the literal text or existing picture; demonstrated using any modality or   media
Determining Importance Identifies words, characters, and/or events as more   important to overall meaning; makes some attempt to explain reasoning
Monitoring Comprehension Identifies location and type of difficulty he/she had while reading and articulates the need to solve the problem
Inferring Draws conclusions and makes predictions using examples from the text
Retelling Retells elements of the text in logical sequence with the book closed; may   include some extension to overall theme, message, background knowledge, refers to characters by specific names and uses vocabulary from text

Please cite me. Page compiled by:  Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS. "Expectations By Grade Level." Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist. N.p., 4 May 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/expectations-by-grade-level/>.

 

1st Grade Reading Expectations

To Meet the Benchmark, 1st grade students should be instructional at  Level G (independent F) by January and Level J (independent I) by June.  A child on grade level, Meeting the Benchmark, may be at the following levels on the following months.  Again, reading is developmental and these are APPROXIMATE:

September ~ C      October ~ D      November ~ E     December ~ F

January ~  G         February ~ G/H       March ~ H/I        April ~ I

May ~ I/J             June ~ J

AT LEVELS C – J,
A CHILD’S READING LEVEL IS DETERMINED BY:

• Is the child reading with acceptable accuracy?  No more than 10 errors/100 words.
• Starting at Level I the child is timed. At least 40 Words Per Minute Meets the Benchmark for Level I, and 45 WPM for Level J.
• Is the child using a variety of strategies (pictures, letter sounds, word chunks, skip it read on go back, asking: Does it look right? Sound right? Make sense?) to figure out unknown words?
• Does the child recognize errors as he/she reads and fixes them?
• Does the child read in longer phrases?
• Before the child reads, the child does a “picture walk.” Is he/she orally connecting with at least 3-4 key events without prompting?
• After reading, and with the book closed, the child does a retelling. Is he/she referring to the characters by name and including all of the important details from the beginning, middle, end in sequence?
• Does the child use the important language and vocabulary from the text in the retelling?
• Can the child retell the story on his/her own without prompts or questions?
• Can the child tell a favorite part and why? We are looking for a response that requires higher level thinking, for example inferring the author’s message in the story, or stating an action that happened in the text with a personal connection.
• Can the child make a connection with this text ~ does it remind the child of another text, a movie or TV show, or something in his/her own life? We are looking for connections that show a deeper understanding of the story. For example, on a fiction story about reusing objects, a connection could be about the importance of recycling.
• If it is nonfiction, can the child quickly locate and use the nonfiction text features to answer questions? (timelines, maps, table of contents, glossary, captions, charts, etc.)

Your child will be asked who reads to or with him/her at home, and to share a title and specific details about a favorite book.  There will also be a survey given asking the child:  What books have you finished lately?  What are you reading at school now?  What are you reading at home now?  What are 3 things you do well as a reader?   What are 3 things you need to work on to become a better reader?

***When you read at home with your child, it is important to have your child point to each word, and figure out unknown words on his/her own by:
a. Look at the picture b. Sound it out c. Skip it, read on, go back
d. Look for familiar chunks in the word, for example in “wagon” there’s “ag” as in “bag” and the chunk “on” e. Always ask self “does that look right, sound right, make sense?”

Always read each book 3x for fluency and accuracy.

OTHER 1ST GRADE ASSESSMENTS / REQUIREMENTS

Each are 1 minute tests:

  • September:  How many letters can you name (upper and lower case mixed in random order).
  • September:  Segment individual sounds heard in a word, for example “apple” /a/ /p/ /l/ and “holes” is /h/ /o/ /l/ /z/.
  • Beginning and Middle of Year:  Hearing and Recording Sounds.  The teacher dictates a sentence that the child writes correctly and/or phonetically, recording all of the sounds he/she hears, putting spaces between words.
  • All Year:  Read 3 letter short vowel nonsense words ~ these can be sounded out ~ for example “sil”  “tob”  “paj”  “zev”  “nud.”  The goal is for the child to recognize these chunks automatically, not sounding out sound by sound.
  • Middle and End of Year:  Oral reading fluency ~ how many words correct in a story can the child read in one minute?  How many details about what he/she just read can he/she recall? 

    What Does An ADVANCED 1st Grader Look Like While Applying Strategies?

    Making Connections/Prior Knowledge Uses background knowledge to enhance comprehension and   interpretation.  Makes text-to-text and   text-to-self connections; uses knowledge of familiar authors to make   predictions (For ex. Curious George books often end the same way.)
    Questioning Asks questions to enhance meaning; can easily answer   questions; beginning awareness of different types of questions~ literal (answers are IN the text) and inferential (answers come from life experience)
    Visualizing/Sensory Imagery Describes own sensory images; images can be elaborated   from the literal text or existing picture; demonstrated using any modality or   media
    Determining Importance Identifies words, characters, and/or events as more   important to overall meaning; makes some attempt to explain reasoning
    Monitoring Comprehension Identifies location and type of difficulty he/she had while reading and articulates the need to solve the problem
    Inferring Draws conclusions and makes predictions using examples   from the text
    Retelling Retells elements of the text in logical sequence; may   include some extension to overall theme, message, background knowledge, refers to characters by specific name and uses vocabulary from text

Please cite me. Page compiled by:  Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS. "Expectations By Grade Level." Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist. N.p., 4 May 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/expectations-by-grade-level/>.

2nd Grade Reading Expectations

To Meet the Benchmark, 2nd grade students should be instructional at:
Level K in November (independent J)
Level L in March (independent K)
Level M by June (independent L)

AT LEVELS K-M
A CHILD’S READING LEVEL IS DETERMINED BY:

• Is the child reading with acceptable accuracy?  No more than 10 errors/100 words.
• The child is timed. At least 55 Words Per Minute Meets the Benchmark for Level K. At least 65 Words Per Minute Meets the Benchmark for Level L. At least 70 Words Per Minute for Meets the Benchmark for Level M.
• Is the child reading with expression that reflects the mood, pace, and tension of the text?
• Does the child read in longer phrases, and heed punctuation?
• After reading the first few paragraphs, can the child make 3 thoughtful predictions of what might happen in the text without peeking ahead at pictures?
• After reading, and with the book closed, the child does a retelling. Is he/she referring to the characters by name and including all of the important details from the beginning, middle, end in sequence?
• Does the child use the important language and vocabulary from the text?
• Can the child retell the story on his/her own without prompts or questions?
• The child has to tell the author’s message ~ what is the author teaching us? The child must support this with text details.
• The child must determine the most important event in the story and why, giving an opinion that reflects higher level thinking.
• If it is nonfiction, can the child quickly locate and use the nonfiction text features to answer questions? (timelines, maps, table of contents, glossary, captions, charts, etc.)

Your child will be asked about types of books he/she likes to read, to tell about a favorite book, and to tell how he/she chooses a book to read.  There will also be a survey given asking the child:  What books have you finished lately?  What are you reading at school now?  What are you reading at home now?  What are 3 things you do well as a reader?   What are 3 things you need to work on to become a better reader?

***When you read at home with your child, it is important to have your child figure out unknown words on his/her own by:
a. Look at the picture b. Sound it out c. Skip it, read on, go back
d. Look for familiar chunks in the word, for example in “wagon” there’s “ag” as in “bag” and the chunk “on” e. Always ask self “does that look right, sound right, make sense?”

What Does An ADVANCED 2nd Grader Look Like While Applying Strategies?

Making Connections/Prior Knowledge Links background knowledge and examples from the text to   enhance comprehension and/or interpretation
Questioning Asks and answers different types of questions;   and finds evidence in the text to support questions and answers
Visualizing/Sensory Imagery Demonstrates multi-sensory images that extend and enrich   the text; demonstration may be through any modality or medium
Determining Importance Identifies at least one key idea, theme, or concept   linking it to the overall meaning of the text.  Uses supporting details from the text to   clearly explain why it is important
Monitoring Comprehension When stuck, identifies difficulties, articulates need to solve the   problem and identifies the appropriate strategy to solve the problem, such as using meaning, visual, or structural cues
Predicting/Inferring Independently makes predictions, interpretations, and/or   draws conclusions; and clearly explains connections using evidence from the   text and personal knowledge, ideas, or beliefs
Retelling/Summarizing/Synthesizing Retells elements of the text in logical sequence with some   extension to overall theme, message, or background knowledge, refers to characters by specific name, and uses vocabulary from text

Please cite me. Page compiled by:  Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS. "Expectations By Grade Level." Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist. N.p., 4 May 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/expectations-by-grade-level/>.

Even if your child is in 3rd, 4th, or even 5th grade you can still read at home with him/her! Alternate reading pages or paragraphs aloud to each other! Borrow books on tape or CD from the library and have your child follow along, too!

To Meet the Benchmark, 3rd grade students should be instructional at:
Level N in November (independent M)
Level O in March (independent N)
Level P by June (independent O)

AT LEVELS N-P
A CHILD’S READING LEVEL IS DETERMINED BY:

• Is the child reading with accuracy?  No more than 10 errors/100 words.  
• The child is timed. Level N students should read at least 75 words per minute. Level O and P at least 80 words per minute.
• Is the child reading with expression that reflects the mood, pace, and tension of the text? OR, if the text is nonfiction, is the child emphasizing key phrases and words?
• Does the child read in longer phrases, and heed punctuation?
• After reading the first few paragraphs, can the child make 3 thoughtful predictions of what might happen in the text without peeking at the pictures ahead? OR, if the text is nonfiction, can the child use the title and table of contents page to think of 3 questions that may be answered in the book?
• After reading the first few paragraphs, can the child stop and describe each character using 3 specific details? OR, if the text is nonfiction, can the child interpret what certain nonfiction text features show?
• After reading, can the child write a summary, including important characters, events, and details, from the beginning, middle, end? OR, if the text is nonfiction, can the child write important facts from each heading?
• Does the child use the important language and vocabulary from the text?
• Can the child answer literal questions?
• The child has to interpret the meaning of the story and support it with details. (For example: What did the character learn? OR Why did the character feel____? OR Why did the character say ____?) OR, if the text is nonfiction, a “why do you think…” question is asked.
• The child must determine the most important event in the story and why, giving an opinion that reflects higher level thinking.

Your child will be asked to fill out a Student Reading Survey which asks: What books have you finished reading lately? What are you reading now at school? What are you reading at home? What are 3 things you do well as a reader? What are 3 things you would like to work on to become a better reader?

***When you read at home with your child, it is important to have your child figure out unknown words on his/her own by:
a. Look at the picture b. Sound it out c. Skip it, read on, go back
d. Look for familiar chunks in the word, for example in “wagon” there’s “ag” as in “bag” and the chunk “on” e. Always ask yourself “does that look right, sound right, make sense?”

What Does An ADVANCED 3rd Grader Look Like While Applying Strategies?

Making Connections/Prior Knowledge Links background knowledge and examples from the text to   enhance comprehension and/or interpretation
Questioning Asks and answers different types of questions;   and finds evidence in the text to support questions and answers
Visualizing/Sensory Imagery Demonstrates multi-sensory images that extend and enrich   the text; demonstration may be through any modality or medium
Determining Importance Identifies at least one key idea, theme, or concept   linking it to the overall meaning of the text.  Uses supporting details from the text to   clearly explain why it is important
Monitoring Comprehension Identifies difficulties , articulates need to solve the   problem and identifies the appropriate strategy to solve the problem, such as   using meaning, visual, or structural cues
Predicting/Inferring Independently makes predictions, interpretations, and/or   draws conclusions; and clearly explains connections using evidence from the   text and personal knowledge, ideas, or beliefs
Retelling/Summarizing/Synthesizing Retells elements of the text in logical sequence with some   extension to overall theme, message, or background knowledge, refers to characters by specific name, and uses vocabulary from text

Please cite me. Page compiled by:  Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS. "Expectations By Grade Level." Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist. N.p., 4 May 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/expectations-by-grade-level/>.

Even if your child is in 3rd, 4th, or even 5th grade you can still read at home with him/her! Alternate reading pages or paragraphs aloud to each other! Borrow books on tape or CD from the library and have your child follow along, too!

To Meet the Benchmark, 4th grade students should be instructional at:
Level Q in November (independent P)
Level R in March (independent Q)
Level S by June (independent R)

AT LEVELS Q-S
A CHILD’S READING LEVEL IS DETERMINED BY:

• Is the child reading with accuracy? No more than 10 errors/100 words.
• The child is timed. Level Q students should read at least 90 words per minute. Level R and S at least 105 words per minute for fiction or 100 words per minute for nonfiction.
• Is the child reading with expression that reflects the mood, pace, and tension of the text? OR, if the text is nonfiction, is the child emphasizing key phrases and words?
• Does the child read in longer phrases, and heed punctuation?
• For Level Q only, after reading the first few paragraphs, can the child stop and describe each character using 3 specific details? OR, if the text is nonfiction, can the child interpret what certain nonfiction text features show?
• After reading the first few paragraphs,can the child make 3 thoughtful predictions of what might happen in the text? OR, if it is nonfiction, can he/she make 3 predictions of what he/she might learn in the text?
• For Level R and S only, can the child form 3 questions he/she had from reading the first part of the text? OR, if the text is nonfiction, can the child use the title and table of contents page to think of 3 questions that may be answered in the book?
• After reading, can the child write a summary, including important characters, events, and details, from the beginning, middle, end. OR, if the text is nonfiction, can the child write important facts from each heading?
• Does the child use the important language and vocabulary from the text?
• Can the child answer literal questions?
• The child has to interpret the meaning of the story and support it with details. (For example: What did the character learn? OR Why did the character feel____? OR Why did the character say ____?) OR, if the text is nonfiction, a “why do you think…” question is asked.
• The child must determine the most important event in the story and why, giving an opinion that reflects higher level thinking.
• The child at Level R and S must check off a strategy that he/she used to help understand the text: FICTION: made connections, asked self questions, visualized, thought of reasons why things happened, understood characters’ feelings ~ with 2 examples from the text where the strategy was used! NONFICTION: recalled what he/she knew about topic, asked self questions, made connections, decided what was important, thought of reasons why things happened, visualized ~ with 2 examples from the text where the strategy was used!

Your child will be asked to fill out a Student Reading Survey which asks: What books have you finished reading lately? What are you reading now at school? What are you reading at home?  Think about your favorite authors and books.  What do you like to read, and why?   What are 3 things you do well as a reader? What are 3 things you would like to work on to become a better reader?  Describe what you plan to do to become a better reader.

***When you read at home with your child, it is important to have your child figure out unknown words on his/her own by:
a.  Sound it out     b. Skip it, read on, go back   c. Look for familiar chunks in the word, for example in “wagon” there’s “ag” as in “bag” and the chunk “on”  d.  Divide words into syllables   e. Always ask self “does that look right, sound right, make sense?”

What Does An ADVANCED 4th Grader Look Like While Applying Strategies?

Making Connections/Prior Knowledge Explains how  background   knowledge enriches the interpretation of the text and begins to make   connections beyond life experience and immediate text
Questioning Uses questions to challenge the text related to the author’s   purpose, theme, or point of view
Visualizing/Sensory Imagery Creates and describes multi-sensory images that extend and   enrich the text; and can explain how those images enhance comprehension
Determining Importance Identifies at least one key concept, idea, or theme as   important in overall text meaning and clearly explains why
Monitoring Comprehension Uses more than one strategy to build meaning when   comprehension breaks down; can articulate which strategies are most appropriate   for a given text
Predicting/Inferring Develops predictions, interpretations, and/or conclusions   about the text that include connections between the text and the reader’s   background knowledge or ideas and beliefs
Retelling/Summarizing/Synthesizing Stops frequently to reflect on text meaning; relates to   the story or genre in a personal way; can identify key themes; may articulate   how this process has created new meaning upon completion of text, refers to characters by specific name, and uses vocabulary from text

Please cite me. Page compiled by:  Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS.  "Expectations By Grade Level." Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist. N.p., 4 May 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/expectations-by-grade-level/>.

 

Even if your child is in 3rd, 4th, or even 5th grade you can still read at home with him/her! Alternate reading pages or paragraphs aloud to each other!  Borrow books on tape or CD from the library and have your child follow along, too!

To Meet the Benchmark, 5th grade students should be instructional at:
Level T in November (independent S)
Level U in March (independent T)
Level V by June (independent U)

AT LEVELS T-V
A CHILD’S READING LEVEL IS DETERMINED BY:

• Is the child reading with acceptable accuracy?  No more than 10 errors/100 words.
• The child is timed. Level T students at least 105 words per minute for fiction, and 100 words per minute for nonfiction. Level U and V at least 115 WPM for fiction and 110 WPM for nonfiction.
• Is the child reading with expression that reflects the mood, pace, and tension of the text? OR, if the text is nonfiction, is the child emphasizing key phrases and words?
• Does the child read in longer phrases, heed punctuation, pause appropriately?
• After reading the first few paragraphs, can the child make 3 thoughtful predictions of what might happen in the text, and 3 questions he/she had from reading the first part of the text? OR, if the text is nonfiction, can the child use the title and table of contents page to think of 3 questions that may be answered in the book, as well as 3 predictions what might he/she learn in the rest of the text?
• After reading, can the child write a summary, including important characters, events, and details, from the beginning, middle, end? OR, if the text is nonfiction, can the child write important facts from each heading.
• Does the child use the important language and vocabulary from the text?
• Can the child answer literal questions?
• The child has to interpret the meaning of the story and support it with details. (For example: What did the character learn? OR Why did the character feel____? OR Why did the character say ____?) OR, if the text is nonfiction, a “why do you think…” question is asked.
• The child must determine the most important event in the story and why, giving an opinion that reflects higher level thinking.
• The child must check off a strategy that he/she used to help understand the text: FICTION: made connections, asked self questions, visualized, thought of reasons why things happened, understood characters’ feelings ~ with 2 examples from the text where the strategy was used! NONFICTION: recalled what he/she knew about topic, asked self questions, made connections, decided what was important by using headings, thought of reasons why things happened, visualized ~ with 2 examples from the text where the strategy was used!

Your child will be asked to fill out a Student Reading Survey which asks: What books have you finished reading lately? What are you reading now at school? What are you reading at home?  Think about your favorite authors and books.  What do you like to read, and why?   What are 3 things you do well as a reader? What are 3 things you would like to work on to become a better reader?  Describe what you plan to do to become a better reader.

***When you read at home with your child, it is important to have your child figure out unknown words on his/her own by:
a.  Sound it out     b. Skip it, read on, go back    c. Look for familiar chunks in the word, for example in “wagon” there’s “ag” as in “bag” and the chunk “on”  d.  Divide words into syllables   e. Always ask self “does that look right, sound right, make sense?"

 What Does An ADVANCED 5th Grader Look Like While Applying Strategies?

Making Connections/Prior Knowledge Explains how  background   knowledge enriches the interpretation of the text and begins to make   connections beyond life experience and immediate text
Questioning Uses questions to challenge the text related to the author’s   purpose, theme, or point of view
Visualizing/Sensory Imagery Creates and describes multi-sensory images that extend and   enrich the text; and can explain how those images enhance comprehension
Determining Importance Identifies at least one key concept, idea, or theme as   important in overall text meaning and clearly explains why
Monitoring Comprehension Uses more than one strategy to build meaning when   comprehension breaks down; can articulate which strategies are most appropriate   for a given text
Predicting/Inferring Develops predictions, interpretations, and/or conclusions   about the text that include connections between the text and the reader’s   background knowledge or ideas and beliefs
Retelling/Summarizing/Synthesizing Stops frequently to reflect on text meaning; relates to   the story or genre in a personal way; can identify key themes; may articulate   how this process has created new meaning upon completion of text, refers to characters by specific name and uses vocabulary from text

Please cite me. Page compiled by:  Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS. "Expectations By Grade Level." Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist. N.p., 4 May 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/expectations-by-grade-level/>.

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COPYRIGHT 05/04/2012.  PLEASE CITE AS FOLLOWS:

Information compiled by:  Araujo, Judith E., M.Ed., CAGS. "Expectations By Grade Level." Mrs. Judy Araujo, Reading Specialist. N.p., 4 May 2012. Web. <http://www.mrsjudyaraujo.com/expectations-by-grade-level/>.  

 

 

Above tables came from: <https://coe3rdgradereading.wikispaces.com/file/view/Reading+Comprehension+Rubric+for+GR.pdf >.

DRA2 Teacher Manual from Pearson Publishing, 2006. 

Graphics are from Google Images.  Right click on them.

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I am happy to share my pages, but please cite me as you would expect your students to cite their sources.  Copyscape alerts me to duplicate content.  Please respect my work.

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